Respect & listen to the first people: Post-Covid Series Part 1

Dear reader

Welcome to Part 1 of a series of blog posts about the actions we are taking as a family to make positive change in the face of climate, social and cultural breakdown. Read about the series here.

On with Part 1, Respect & listen to the first people

Why?

We are very fortunate to live and work on land that has been stewarded by communities of families for over 80,000 years before it was stolen from them relatively recently. It’s important for us non-indigenous folk to acknowledge and pay respect to the traditional owners and work towards repatriation.

How?

We directly benefit from the traditional lands we work and live on, and to do the right thing is to pay the rent, which is to reign in our white privilege and to financially support our local indigenous communities and/or organisation like Seed Mob on an ongoing basis. It’s also important to take time to learn the real history, and to acknowledge and pay respect to the traditional owners. This is the critical first step of many steps towards healing the land and bring about social justice.

Further learning


Read a well written piece on this topic by Milkwood here.
Read this incredible book, Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe.
Read Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer. An important and stunning read about connection and reciprocity with nature though the lenses of science, ancient wisdom and deep love.
Read Good Life Permaculture talk about how permaculture has everything to do with racism.
Listen to Green Dreamer podcast interview Mark Charles, part 1 and part 2. Where he talks about a deep connection to his land and his people, and how the dominant American worldview has been born out of white supremacist’s government policy. And it doesn’t take much of a leap to see that same foundational problems are festering here in Australia too.

About this series


This is one part of a series of blog posts about ideas that since the outbreak of Covid-19 have become clear to me that we must put into action. We must take our hands out of our pockets, stop postulating and/or despairing about the state of things and start listening, and start doing. I’ve had enough of the ‘bigger is better’ rhetoric, which is fuelling the economic growth at any expense mindset. I think we need to slow down, simplify and aim for an ‘enough is enough’ world view, which can sustain healthy communities, cultures and environment. This series breaks down a whole list of actionable things that we are working on as a family. Read the introduction to this series and the list of links to each blog post in this series here.

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